Pools and Insurance

All pools—from a simple above-ground kiddy pool to an aquatic extravaganza—can be dangerous and need to be properly insured and comply with local safety standards.

According to the Center for Disease Control, over 3,200 people drown each year. Among children, ages one to four, most drowned in residential swimming pools. Most of these young children had been out of sight for less than five minutes and were in the care of one or both parents at the time.

If you plan to purchase a pool, the I.I.I. suggests that you:

  • Contact your town or municipality
    Each town will have its own definition of a “pool,” often based on its size and water depth. If the pool you are planning to buy meets the definition, then you must comply with local safety standards and building codes. This may include installing a fence of a certain size, locks, decks and pool safety equipment.

  • Call your insurance agent or company representative
    Let your insurance company know that you have a pool, since it will increase your liability risk. Pools are considered an “attractive nuisance” and it may be advisable to purchase additional liability insurance. Most homeowners policies include a minimum of $100,000 worth of liability protection. Pool owners, however, may want to consider increasing the amount to $300,000 or $500,000.

    You may want to talk to your agent or company representative about purchasing an umbrella liability policy. For an additional premium of about $200 to $300 a year, you get $1 million of liability protection over and above what you have on your home. It would also provide added liability protection when you drive.

    If the pool itself is expensive, or if you decide to install an in-ground structure, you should also have enough insurance protection to replace it in the event it is destroyed by a storm or other disaster.

This information was taken from http://www.iii.org/individuals/homei/hbs/pool/ and may not be the opinion of Diane Cardano & Her Team.